Applications

Laser Chillers, Medical Device Cooling, Electronics Cooling and a number of notable applications.

Keeping Cool About Your Hot Laser

The trend of higher laser output power in increasingly smaller packages has many benefits in reducing the floor space requirements in production floor, cleanroom, medical operating room, clinics, and laboratory environments.  Laser product managers are seeing similar pressure to reduce the size of the external laser chiller while still offering improved cooling and energy efficiency.  Some are considering adding the refrigeration system directly into their laser system to form an integrated compact package.  It is important to make decisions early in the concept development of the product development cycle to ease integration of advanced cooling methods such as direct refrigerant cooling.  Read More…


Medical Device Cooling

Active thermal management is vital in a number of medical device applications including patient core temperature management, skin cooling, medical device cooling, and laboratory equipment cooling. These applications include initial emergency medical services, in-hospital patient thermal management, a range of procedures that take place in doctor’s offices, and in laboratory equipment. To meet this growing need, medical device designers need highly efficient and compact cooling systems that can be integrated into their systems, often with the option of battery power for mobility.  Read Part 1 here… Read Part 2 here…


Electronics Cooling

Military Grade Electronics CoolingOver the last ten years there has been a well-documented increase in the energy density of electronic devices.  As this­­ energy density has gone up, so has the heat dissipation on electronics packages. In response to this challenge, significant research has taken place to develop chip level cooling systems to meet heat fluxes in excess of 1000W/cm2. As stated by Phelan et al.1, “Calculations indicate that the only possible approach to meeting this heat flux condition, while maintaining the chip temperature below 65°C, is to utilize refrigeration.” While research has focused on achieving heat transfer rates at the chip level, the resistance to heat transfer to ambient air is often more critical.2 In fact, the heat transfer resistance to ambient air as the final heat sink is the dominating factor in system performance. Certain classes of components such as field programmable gate arrays, diode lasers and mobile network systems are being deployed in environments where passive cooling systems cannot maintain junction temperatures below required upper limits. Programs such as the US Army’s Warfare Information Network–Tactical (WIN-T) fall into this category.3These factors place additional constraints on designers to meet the thermal management challenges of their electronics systems.  Read More…


Cooling of Laser Power Meters and Laser Beam Stops

Laser output power is a fundamental parameter which requires monitoring regardless if it is a scientific or industrial application.  When the laser average power exceeds a few hundred watts, water cooling is recommended to prevent damage to the detector.  Aspen Systems visited IPG Photonics in Marlborough with a water cooled laser power meter with the Aspen systems LCS-600 liquid chiller.  Read More…

 

 


Cooling of High Power UV LED Systems for Curing Applications

Honle UV, http://www.honleuv.com/ successfully demonstrated the use of Aspen Systems’ LCS-600, ultra-compact liquid chiller system.  The LCS series is based on Aspen’s vapor compression technology using the world’s smallest compressor.  It shares many of the advantages UV LEDs including small size, high efficiency and the chiller is powered by 24 Vdc making it ideal for mobile applications.

According to Deivis Parejo – Business Development Manager at Honle UV America, Inc. “The Aspen LCS-600 is ideal for use with our LED Powerline series.  The chiller is less than one quarter the size and less than one eighth the weight of more conventional chillers”.  Read More…